Lookin’ back at the Summer of 2013

picture-2Phew, it’s been a while!

Autumn is upon the Upper Valley and I’ve finally tied the last bow on projects that were started this summer. As such, I feel it’s an appropriate time for some kind of reflection.

At the heart of this summer were coffee, kids and comics.

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In the months of July and August I got to work with Paula Levin, the head experimentalist and founder of  the LAB, the Literary Arts Boom program.
Paula had me hopping across the city of Pittsburgh teaching comics workshops. At the end of my stint in Pittsburgh teaching comics to kids ages 6-12, was the Comics Club Camp, a weeklong intensive cartooning camp that provided kids with 6 hours chocabloc with writing, drawing, reading and play.

If you don’t know anything about Paula Levin’s Literary Arts Boom [The LAB] here in Pittsburgh, I suggest you read this nice little write up by Marty Levine on Pop City Media. It’s an amazing educational program in Pittsburgh.

The LAB offers free out-of-school programming to Pittsburgh youth, ages 6-18. Students practice and improve their inquiry and writing skills in a safe and unique space by participating in project-based workshops that incorporate art, technology, and communication. Mentorship and creativity inspire students to pursue their interests, find their voices, and tell their stories.

Paula, The LAB’s “head experimentalist” is focused building a culture of reading, writing, and creativity in Pittsburgh, giving youth the tools, support and resources necessary to bloom into critical minded and inspired thinkers. Given the great divides that exist across the American public education system, it’s a real honor to be involved with a program as vibrant and ambitious as the LAB.

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It was a joy to work with this bunch of inkstuds.  I couldn’t have done it without the assistance of Jena Tegeler and Jenn Lisa.

I love comics. You know that, reader. So you know that the opportunity to give back to the world through the teaching of comics is one I treasure being given. This was without a doubt the highlight of my summer.

I believe comics have an extremely significant impact on children (I can pull up some research and studies if you like, but I’d rather talk from my heart for a moment!). They allow children to gain a visual literacy, something crucial as they progress towards becoming a prose reader. Cartoons offer a less-structured view of literature and a creative way of learning. They make the act of holding a book feel more natural, without overwhelming young readers. (And once they have bridged that gap to traditional reading, comics  present an even more nuanced kind of literacy that, at its height is the marriage between graphic design and poetry!)

Children, especially at an early age, often struggle with reading and writing, especially with the given obstacles in their schooling system and communities. Comics, however, enable them to read and tell stories at an early age. They allow for kids to communicate in their own personal way. That means so much.

Reading has always been a struggle for me, so I can relate to reluctant readers. I struggled to learn English when I moved to the United States from Venezuela. Nevertheless, I know how much reading opens up the world and I feel a responsibility to help kids develop the skills they need to experience the deeper, richer world that reading provides.

I see my role as a teacher of comics as above all a facilitator of visual communication. In that spirit, I’d like to share with you some photos from the camp!

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If you’d like to see the comics that came out of the camp, check out this publication I put together! The collection contains work that each student selected from his or her portfolio. Some students were churning out so many pages during the week that the book only reflects a sliver of their output!

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One of my favorite activities during the Comics Club Camp was to have kids fill in the word balloons for comics whose word balloons had been emptied. Comics mad libs if you will. I chose some pages by Tove Jansson, Lewis Trondheim and Iris Yan. The commonality was that all the characters were animals. I found that kids could relate to those comics the most easily. The results were a riot to read out loud as a group.

After reading our pages we read what the original strips said and talked about all the different ways in which we had interpreted the body language and scene changes.

If you’d like to know more about this part of my summer and would like to chat about teaching comics, send me a message or leave a comment! I’m really passionate about this and could talk your ear off about how to fold comics making into the lives of future generations.

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Helping me out during the Comics Club Camp was Jenn Lisa, a talented cartoonist who I had the pleasure of meeting this summer. She found out about the camp through the fliers that’d been posted around Pittsburgh and mentioned she was interested in helping out.

Outside of the camp we met up and drew. It was really nice to talk comics and drawing with someone as seriously as I did with Jenn, especially out of White River Junction. In White River Junction I’ve felt like a minority given that my default drawing state is doodling, so meeting someone for who doodles are equally important was great.

Talking comics was fun, but the real joy was drawing with Jenn.  Jamming off of her energy. She creates the coolest textures with pen and pencil and has an awesome eye for color. The following drawing was made between Jenn, Jena and me.

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Cartooning-wise, Jenn focuses her comics energies in daily comics that she occasionally posts online. I really admire the her ability to capture fleeting moments in pencil. It’s a real skill. I highly suggest you check out her work. (See below!)

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While in Vermont I finished off this drawing that collages several of our jam drawings. It’s really neat to collaborate this way.

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Before the Comics Club Camp was in full swing, I organized an independent press show in the Garfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. It was called the Little Book Fair. I scheduled it to coincide with the the monthly Unblurred Gallery Crawl on Penn Avenue in Garfield. Admission was free and it was free for artists, writers, publishers and bookstores to exhibit. (This event was an attempt to take the lessons I’d learned a year ago when I put together the ToonSeum Minicon in the Spring of 2012 and apply them first hand.)

My main motivation with this little show was to give back to the community that has given me so much in these early stages of my development as a cartoonist. I know for certain that I wouldn’t be on the path that I’m on right now if it hadn’t been for the tireless spirit of Bill Boichel, owner of Copacetic Comics. He opened my eyes to the world of independent press through the first iteration of the Pittsburgh Independent Expo (PIX).

I thought it’d be nice to put together a small, intimate show that could make this kind of publishing activity visible to a public that doesn’t necessarily self-identify as readers of comics, ‘zines and independent press books.

As a result, the Little Book Fair aimed to be a one-day celebration of the vibrant small-press and self-publishing community in Pittsburgh. Dedicated to fostering community and dialogue amongst independent artists, small publishers, bookstores and readers, the fair was a success in bringing readers and writers face to face in a welcoming space.

You might remember me posting the flier for it a while back. Here’s a photo from when I was making the fliers!

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I printed the posters one evening, quick and dirty at the Artist’s Image Resource in Pittsburgh. Having access to a place like AIR made a print job like this a breeze. It’s an awesome place.

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Pictured above are Pittsburgh residents Wayne Wise, Rachel Masilamani and Tom Scioli. What do they have in common? They’re all winners of the Xeric Grant! I believe that this might be the first photo of them all together holding the books that they published through the Xeric Grant. If it is, boy what an honor to have taken it!

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This picture makes my eyes tear up. Jena and Jess were the best housemates I’ve ever had in Pittsburgh. I miss ‘em.

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As you can see, there was a great turn out!

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Check out the photo album on Flickr if you’d like to see more photographs!

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Early in the summer I submitted several comics to the Yellow Fox Quarterly. The Yellow Fox Quarterly is a new journal of words and pictures, edited and managed by Sara Keats, a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University.

They decided to include several of the comics that I submitted, which was a real honor. They printed my nine page comic ode to the poet, Basho! The Quarterly is filled with lots of great fiction and poetry. It’s really nice to see my comics in the company of all those words! Sara did a bang up job putting this first issue together. I’m enthused for future issues.

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While in Pittsburgh, I got in touch with my fellow classmates and the new class of students at the Center for Cartoon Studies to organize a little anthology of comics called Quick and Dirty Summer. I organized a book like this last August, and it was a great start to the academic year at the Center for Cartoon Studies.  Just about everyone contributed 4 pages that explored the topic of “Summer”, which brought the total page count to a whopping 72 pages! It features broken hearts, anal probes and lemonade, among other things. What more could you ask for?

Let me know if you’d like a copy of this baby! I’ve been selling them for $5.

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After I returned to White River Junction to resume my studies at the Center For Cartoon Studies, I buckled down with my pals, Simon Reinhardt and Luke Healy to assemble the second issue of Dog City, the box anthology that we curate together.

As I’ve mentioned previous posts, Dog City is a small press comics magazine dedicated to publishing quality minicomics. Each issue of Dog City consists of a curated selection of minicomics packaged in an artfully designed cardboard box. I drew the cover for this issue!

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In this issue, I contributed a selection of the daily comics that I’ve been making since January. I packaged the comics as individual pages, two comics on one page, eight pages total. I like it when these comics can float around and be rearranged. It feels like a print equivalent of how many people experience them out of order on the internet.

The sleeves themselves have a screen printed design that wraps around. They’re really simple and I really like them for that. I like to imagine that folks pick out their favorite of the dailies and tape it up on their bedroom walls or on their refrigerators.

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Production on this box was sped up significantly by the tireless help of friends. They helped during several production assembly sessions that we organized. We couldn’t have done this run of 100 boxes without their help.

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Here’s a little peek at the making of the posters. For this box, cartoonist and designer Christina Lee designed the poster. We printed them in the lab in the Colodny building at the Center for Cartoon Studies.

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We donated a copy to the Schulz Library. Pictured above is Dan Rinylo, creator of Mangy Mutt. It was a treat to see the smile on his face as he poured through the contents of this issue. That’s the moment I live for when making a book like this!

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Then we took the boxes to the Small Press Expo in Bethesda, Maryland. We showed off our babies to the world. That place was choc-a-bloc with great cartoonists. We had the opportunity to chat with many friends old and new.1229939_10151916063819515_372980309_n

I’m really proud of the work that Luke, Simon and I have been doing on the Dog City Project. It’s an honor to be able work with cartoonists I respect and admire in this editorial capacity.

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Besides working on Dog City, I got in contact with several friends to coordinate the screen printing of illustrations and post cards.  A highlight of this printing work for me was Caitlin Boyle’s illustration of Tima from the film Metropolis.

In this past year I’ve been honing my printing in skills and helping print things for friends has been one of the primary avenues for that growth to happen. I hope to incorporate a lot more printing into my thesis year here at the Center for Cartoon Studies.

Right now, I’m continuing forwards with my daily comics, writing weekly about new arrivals and archive highlights at the Schulz blog, and slowly teasing out some long form comics all while doing the other things that a guy’s gotta do to keep his head on straight. This is going to be a really interesting coming 8 months of my thesis in cartooning!

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July: Wottamonth!

julybannerHot dog. July’s been a busy month in Pittsburgh!

Although I haven’t had much time to be making and publishing my own work,  I’ve been knee deep in comics, while soaking up the summer in Pittsburgh.

Aside from organizing the Little Book Fair and assembling an all-star crew of cartoonists for another exciting Dog City Press endeavor, I’ve been teaching all over the city of Pittsburgh.

Two highlights of this month have been being a part of the Computing Workshop‘s summer staff  and working with the incredible, education super-stars, Mary Hart and Paula Levin.

Mary Hart’s Computing Workshop, located in Squirrel Hill, provides educational opportunities for students and adults on the autistic spectrum or with other differences or obstacles to success in traditional school settings. The CW offers adapted instruction across the curriculum, with particular emphasis on computing, technology, and the arts, along with social and communication skills, in a safe and supportive setting. I’ve been involved with the Computing Workshop for three years now and every summer it’s only gotten better.

Besides teaching comics, reading and programming at the Computing Workshop, I’ve been hopping across the city of Pittsburgh teaching comics workshops thanks to Paula Levin’s Literary Arts Boom program. If you don’t know anything about Paula Levin’s Literary Arts Boom [The LAB] here in Pittsburgh, I suggest you read this nice little write up by Marty Levine on Pop City Media.

The LAB offers free out-of-school programming to Pittsburgh youth, ages 6-18. Students practice and improve their inquiry and writing skills in a safe and unique space by participating in project-based workshops that incorporate art, technology, and communication. Mentorship and creativity inspire students to pursue their interests, find their voices, and tell their stories.

The LAB provides a space for collaboration, innovation and community engagement among youth, adults, and organizations focused on kids and creativity. Individuals, ranging from authors to zoologists, can share their talents, passion, and wisdom with local youth.

Paula, The LAB’s “head experimentalist” is focused building a culture of reading, writing, and creativity in Pittsburgh, giving youth the tools, support and resources necessary to bloom into critical minded and inspired thinkers.

Given the great divides that exist across the American public education system, it’s a real honor to be involved with a program as vibrant and ambitious as the LAB.

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Photograph by Alessandra Hartkopf


Announcing: The Little Book Fair!

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Have you heard about The Little Book Fair?  It’s an exciting event that’ll be happening here in Pittsburgh in August that I’m involved in organizing!

The Little Book Fair
will be a one-day celebration of the vibrant small-press and self-publishing community in Pittsburgh. The Little Book Fair is dedicated to fostering community and dialogue amongst independent artists, small publishers, bookstores and readers.

It will occur Friday, August 2 from 6-10 PM at 113 North Pacific Avenue during the Unblurred Gallery Crawl in Pittsburgh.

If you’re interested in learning more about the event, hop on over to the Little Book Fair’s website.

If you’re interested in tabling, Click here!

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Submit to the Andromeda Quarterly

Have you submitted comics to the Andromeda Quarterly, yet? If not, now’s your chance!

Andromeda is a comics anthology based in Pittsburgh, PA. Published on a monthly occurrence for two years from 2010 to 2012, it’s now released on a quarterly basis.

Andromeda seeks out talented and dedicated individuals wherever they can be found (that means you!). The Pittsburgh based publication hopes to establish a creative platform in which to project expression and artistic experience.

October 2013 Issue:

Release Date: October 1st, 2013
Submission Deadline: August 15th, 2013

  • Size: 6×9 (unless otherwise noted; i.e. theme issues)
  • Resolution: at least 200 dpi
  • Color Modes: B&W as well as COLOR images are accepted and reviewed
  • Preferred File Formats: JPEG, TIFF, PNG, PDF or GIF
  • Maximum Page Submission: 40 pages

All submissions can be sent to:  andromedaquarterly@gmail.com

Here’s hoping to see your comics in the coming issue!


Storytellers’ Studio this July!

FinalstorytellersHey Pittsburghers!

Do you know any kids ages 5-13 who love writing and sharing stories? They might love to participate in Storytellers’ Studio: After-Camp Care!

Over the course of this five-day program, kids get to collaborate with other campers on a group story and adapt it into plays, songs/raps, and comics. I’ll be facilitating the comics making. I’m really excited to be part of this program and can’t wait to see what we all cook up comics-wise!

For more information about the program, visit the Facebook event page.

If you know somebody who might be interested in this, I’d love for you to pass this along their way.


Pay Attention to This: Rachel Masilamani

This article orginally appeared in Dog City: Issue 1

There’s things you can’t do with words and there’s things you can’t do with pictures, that’s what’s so exciting about the form.

It’s constantly pressing against your limitations.
- Rachel Masilamani 2013

A veteran self-publisher, Rachel Masilamani has been making comics in the United States since 1997. Her first comics collection, RPM Comics #1, received a grant from the Xeric Foundation and was named “Best Comic Book” by the Baltimore City Paper. Since then, her comics have appeared in Meathaus, Street Runoff, Graphics Classics, The Indiana Review, in other anthologies and in her own publications.

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An accomplished story teller, Masilamani is hard pressed to categorize her work.

Endlessly fascinated with people, Masilamani draws inspiration from her own life and the behaviors of those around her to create stories that burrow themselves deep into the minds of her readers. Her stories elegantly blend naturalistic storytelling with expressionistic visual representation.

In much of her work, Masilamani explores notions of local and universal truth by blurring the line between fact and fiction. In so doing, she makes her inner life palpable. She walks this tightrope in ways similar to the memoir work of Carol Tyler, Mardou and Gabrielle Bell.

Although Masilamani grew up reading newspaper comics, she didn’t start making her own comics until she was a student at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD in the late nineties.

Her first formal forays into the medium were under the guidance of Baltimore based cartoonist and instructor, Tom Chalkley. One of the stories made under Chalkley’s guidance, Pen Bandit, appears in Masilamani’s first collection of comics, RPM #1. Originally planned to be a short film that she wanted to propose to John Hopkin’s film club, Masilamani decided to make Pen Bandit a comic on her own to avoid the inevitable frustrations she foresaw of having to compromise her vision.

After she graduated from John Hopkins University in 1999 with a degree in Anthropology and a minor in Art History, she didn’t go looking for a job or head off to graduate school, rather she attempted to make cartooning a full time job.

For months she dedicated herself to improving her cartooning and honing her ability to translate her observations to paper. It was a bold move as a young cartoonist.

Her efforts paid off when she received the Xeric Foundation Grant. The grant provided her with $5000 to print and distribute her first collection of comics, RPM #1 in 2000. With the help of the grant, she hit the ground running.

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The first issue of RPM featured uniquely original, personal stories, carefully rendered in pencil and pen & ink. Though the work might not have been fully developed, it was a promising collection of stories that offered a fresh perspective.

After continuing freelance work and putting out the occasional minicomic, Masilamani published RPM #2 in Baltimore.

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RPM #2 retained the same ingenious sense of observation and personality that made RPM #1 stand out, but revealed the hand of an artist who had tighter storytelling mechanics and a greater confidence in draftsmanship. Comprised of memoir, folk tales, and urban fantasies, the variety of genres in RPM #2 placed Masilamani’s narrative chops center stage.

After publishing RPM #2, life caught up with Masilamani. Though she’d given the life of a free-lance cartoonist and illustrator a go, it wasn’t meant to be.

Masilamani returned to school to study Library Science and began a series of relocations that wound up taking her to Pittsburgh, PA. During this time, Masilamani slowed down her release of comics.

While it would seem that Masilamani had taken a hiatus from her cartooning, the truth was that she continued to work and re-work new comics privately.

This new period of cartooning saw Masilamani put out two self-contained mini-comics, Song Contest and Las Cuerpas. While both stories take place in the same physical landscape, the Mexican-American border, Song Contest and Las Cuerpas explore radically different emotional landscapes.

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Song Contest tells the story of a young woman who leaves her home to participate in a televised singing contest. The comic is a playful experiment that cleverly uses the iconographic power of the comics medium.

In Song Contest, Masilamani allows the animals that aid the protagonist on her journey to speak in words, while all of Masilamani’s human characters speak in icons. As a result of this formal decision, Masilamani creates a smooth, but idiosyncratic reading experience that lends the story an air of heartfelt whimsy.

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Las Cuerpas, which Masilamani published in 2010, is much heavier. It deals head on with the femicides of Ciudad Juarez Mexico. A wordless comic inked expressively in pen and ink, Las Cuerpas swiftly moves across the city of Juarez and builds to a feverish crescendo.

Las Cuerpas is the result of Masilamani living in New Mexico and experiencing first hand the constant news about women and girls being murdered in Ciudad Juarez with no discernible follow up.

Though at the time she felt powerless to do anything about the murders, Masilamani couldn’t stop imagining that something could make the femicides unignorable.

Las Cuerpas is her attempt at making the horrors impossible to ignore.

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Since Las Cuerpas, Masilamani has self-published two more collections of stories, Odds Are in 2012 and No Words in 2013. The two collections document a graceful evolution in the poetry of Masilamani’s story telling.

Odds Are contains 9 stories, each of which, in their own way, experiment with the semiotic relationship between words and pictures. Comprised of explorations of sensory experience, feminine identity and gender politics, Odds Are shows Masilamani handle extremely nuanced material.

No Words consists of 3 longer stories, which focus on semiotics and trust, race and ethnicity, and urban disenfranchisement. In these stories Masilamani allows herself more time to slowly create dense, inhabitable yet challenging narrative spaces.

These stories, though rooted in traditional narratives, make one think of the comics poetry of Tom Neely and John Hankiewicz, mainly because of Masilamani’s mature poetic, highly symbolic, dense and at times abstract, language that takes readers out of their comfort zones.

Attentively tuned to the mechanics involved in the co-mixing of abstract languages, Masilamani achieves a certain alchemy with these comics. It’s thrilling to read.

One hopes to see more comics like these from Masilamani because it is a joy to see her revel in the liminal spaces of comics.

You can purchase Rachel Masilamani’s work online from her site, RPM Comics.


Bartkira – Channeling

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About a month and a half ago, artist James Harvey saw some Akira/Simpsons fan art done by Ryan Humphrey.

Inspired by the energy of the energy of the combination, Harvey proposed a group project to folks on the internet that was as silly as it was monumental. Harvey proposed they redraw the entire 6 volume, 2160 page Akira saga, transposing it into the Simpsons universe. The Bartkira project was born.

It’s been really interesting to see the hands of so many creators distort and warp the Akira saga.

I was assigned pages 276-280 of the second volume of  Akira. Last week I finished my 5 pages.

Having just returned to Pittsburgh, PA, I haven’t had access to a scanner nor tablet. Despite that, I wanted to create something exciting, that distilled and slightly abstracted the core elements of Otomo and Groening’s respective universes. I also wanted to make the pages a bit garish.

Here’s what I  worked out. I’d love to hear what you think.

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If you’re interested in seeing more of the work that people have churned out for the Bartkira project, hop on over to the Bartkira Tumblr page.

 


Andromeda Quarterly #3 Release Party


For those of you in or near Pittsburgh, PA next week:

Come join the Andromeda Quarterly this Thursday, the 23rd from 6pm to 8pm at the Copacetic Comics Co. for an evening of celebrating Pittsburgh’s own Rustbelt Comics Anthology. Click here for more event details.

The publication is now on Issue 3 and I’ve got a couple of comics in the issue. Come check it out, talk comics and meet some of the contributors in person. They’d love to have you.

The new issue will be for sale as well as past Quarterly and Monthly issues. If you’re interested in submitting you’ll have a chance to talk to the editors and get advice/feedback on your work.

I’ll be there. Hope you can make it!

(Of course, if you can’t make it, you can order a copy online! )


the Drawing Power Report

This article was co-written with Simon Reinhardt. It originally appeared at Dog City Press.
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This past weekend a couple of us from Dog City trekked down from Vermont to Pittsburgh, PA for the Drawing Power conference at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

The museum setting established a wonderful tone for the conference. It was a breath of fresh air to go to an intimate event with such a clear focus on discussing comics.

A big thanks is due to Jude Vachon, zine librarian at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Vachon was the core organizer of this event and responsible for steering it toward such a success.

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The days events ran from 10 AM until 5 PM. Each panel was a jam packed 45 minutes.

The first panel of the day was moderated by Bill Boichel, owner of the Copacetic Comics Company. It focused on the idiosyncrasies of the local Pittsburgh comics scene. The panel consisted of Lizzee SolomonAndy ScottPaulette Poullet and Nate Mcdonough.

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The panelists spoke about their experiences self-publishing and the role that the Pittsburgh community played in their work practices.

Scott spoke about his anthology, Andromeda and the restructuring of the publication in late 2012 from a monthly to a quarterly format. Solomon spoke about cartooning being at the core of her multi-disciplinary work practices while Nate McDonough retold the beginnings of hisGrixly publication.

McDonough, Solomon and Scott spoke of their times drawing together during the early issues of Andromeda and the competitive one-upmanship that their drawing parties would foster.

The panel explored the inroads that the four cartoonists had made into self-publishing and the external factors in their lives that had driven them to continue to self-publish in Pittsburgh.

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Following the Pittsburgh cartoonists panel, French cartoonist, Boulet (Gilles Roussel) , author of the 24-hour comic Darkness took the stage to give a lecture on the evolution of his cartooning practices.

He spoke about streamlining his creative process and the increased emphasis on improvisation that he had developed in his work. He spoke about working with Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim on the series, Dungeon along with the exquisite corpse comic, Chicou Chicou, that he developed with several French cartoonists.

The aim of Chicou Chicou was to create a fictional “auto-bio” group comics blog. The cartoonists would pass strips back and forth over the internet adding pages until they were complete. Each of the cartoonists involved created a persona and crafted a drawing style that suited their character. Boulet played a small, geeky girl named Ella.

Besides discussing the subtleties of drawing stories from the perspective of a female character, Boulet talked about the harassment he received online when writing under a female pen-name. He reported receiving unsolicited love letters and invitations on dates and noted that when he got into disputes people would ask “are you on your period or something?”

At the end of his talk, Boulet spoke succinctly of his influences and of his current project, a 200 page improvised story in which he is neither pencilling nor scripting. He showed several of the 60 pages that he’d  completed and the audience was in awe.

Freelance writer, illustrator and graphic designer, Joan Reilly then took the stage and talked about her work editing the forthcoming feminist anthology, The Big Feminist But. Joan presented the book’s contents and the genesis of the project.

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The Big Feminist But arose from Reilly and O’Leary’s attempts to learn why so many of us, women and men, couch discussions around feminism with the phrase “I’m not a feminist, but…” or “I am a feminist, but…”. They decided to embark on the journey of making a comics anthology as the first step in starting a conversation about the issue.

The result is a promising book that features “graphic musings on life, love, lust and liberation,” by talents such as Jeffrey Brown, Gabrielle Bell, and Lauren Weinstein.

The book’s list of contributors is especially notable for including a number of couples working together, as well as single men and women. Reilly mentioned that a number of Kickstarter backers expressed their gratitude that men were involved with the book as well– an observation that highlights The Big Feminist But’s drive to create an expansive and inclusive conversation about feminism.

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Subsequently, John Porcellino,  took the stage to talk about the story of his life of zine-making and distribution. He talked about the story of King Cat,  and the Spit and a Half zine and comix distribution service.

Porcellino touched on his artistic development and the early years of King Cat (focusing on the first 50 issues, collected in King Cat Classix). Porcellino has created books, comics, and publications since he was 7 or 8, and was creating zines for years before he discovered Factsheet 5 and learned that other people were doing it too.

He read some highlights from early King Cat issues and talked about his work processes and goals in creating that work. One revelation from this portion of the talk was the influence of Marvel’s monster comics from the 50s and early 60s.

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While the relationship between these fantastic stories and Porcellino’s chronicles of everyday life might not be immediately apparent, Porcellino emphasized the drab, repetitive nature of the monster stories as well as the alienation of their typical mad scientist protagonists. “As an artist I’m very interested in repetition and boredom,” he said.

Porcellino also talked about the sales and distribution history of King Cat, which was instructive for the many self-publishers in the audience. Gesturing to the cover of the first issue of King Cat to be sold in stores, Porcellino noted the 35 cent cover price and remarked “in true zine fashion, I probably charged 35 cents because it cost me 36 cents to print.”

He also talked about his history of working bizarre or menial jobs to support his comics, and pinpointed King Cat issue 42, which he wrote, drew, and edited entirely on company time, as “the point I became a professional cartoonist, because I was being paid to draw comics.”

Porcellino spoke about his interest in the idea of real life and the ineffable experience of being alive. One thing he mentioned—and we think this is a big part of what makes King Cat so special—is that he tried not just to describe the event of his experience, but to communicate the feeling of that experience. Porcellino characterized the subject matter of his comics as “this weird feeling I had… [of] the underlying mystery in every moment,” a description we think King Cat readers will agree is quite fitting.

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Caitlin McGurk, librarian at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum moderated the following panel on self-publishing. Porcellino remained on stage to join Ramsey Beyer, Rachel Masilamani and Bill Boichel to chat about their experiences self-publishing in the United States.

Similar to the first panel of the day, the panelists spoke of how they’d found their way to comics and more generally towards self-publishing.

Masilamani recounted first encountering zines through Christina Kelly’s zine of the month column in Sassy magazine. She spoke about the experience of receiving the Xeric grant and the consequences that it brought along with it. It allowed for her to get her first comics into the world and to hit the ground running with her first collection of RPM, but from the get go she was on her own.

The panelists thoughts on the pricing of mini comics were particularly interesting. Not surprisingly, Boichel as a vendor and Porcellino as a distributor had a lot to bring to the discussion of the relationship between self-expression and the commodification of desire. Boichel mentioned that artists sometimes come to him with $20 minicomics, reporting that they sold a lot of copies in New York, but he knows they won’t sell at that price point in Pittsburgh.

Beyer emphasized the importance she placed on the ethics of the production process and mentioned having worked with 1984 Press in Oakland California.

Boichel, suggested that aspiring cartoonists always pick someone to write to; a friend, an acquaintance, a stranger, someone.  By thinking of their audience’s interests and their budget, they could be more likely to create works that would move through the world more freely.

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Dash Shaw followed the self-publishing panel. He began his talk by showing some recent animation work. One of the most striking animations that he played was the music video,Seraph, which he had made in collaboration with Frank Santoro and other artists for Sigur Ros’ valtari film experiment. 

Shaw took the audience through a brief survey of his cartooning work, starting with his three current publications– the minicomic New Jobs, published by Uncivilized Books, the pamphlet3 New Stories, and the graphic novel New School, both published by Fantagraphics– and working his way backward to the mammoth graphic novel Bottomless Belly Button.

One through-line of Shaw’s talk was his thoughts regarding line and color. “I could talk about color forever,” he said, and it’s hard not to get excited by his original and distinctive ideas.

Many of the pages Shaw showed from New School use color in ways that are entirely divorced from traditional comic book coloring. Shaw rarely uses colors  to simply fill out the drawing, preferring instead to use the collision between the color and the line-art to create meaning and emotion, often in oblique and subtle ways.

This unwillingness to spell things out directly for the reader was evident in Shaw’s discussion of line and drawing as well. He spoke of being inspired by David Mazzucchelli’s idea of the “dumb line,” (which he describes in more detail here) and by trying to push back against the conventions of “good” illustration.

“So much illustration is about telling people what something is and how to feel about it,” Shaw said, adding that he wanted to make drawings that don’t tell their reader how to feel.

He also spoke about his fascination with the house styles found, among other places, in manga and Archie comics, speculating about an ideal, impossible Archie style. In Shaw’s conception, even the best Archie artists fall short of this Platonic style, and their own personal style would be the accumulation of their failings at achieving a true Archie drawing.

All in all, it was a dense, stimulating talk, and we can’t wait to dive into New School and read it with the attention Shaw’s work demands.

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The final panel of the day, “A Career in Comics” was moderated by Caitlin McGurk and featured Jim RuggEd PiskorFrank Santoro and Dash Shaw.

The fluidity of the discussion was really satisfying. Without much effort it hopped from discussions of style (and avoiding “style”) to explorations of narrative collapse. Of course, a highlight of the panel was the discussion of the differences between making money around comics and making money in comics.

Career development and survival were recurring topics, and every member of the panel had a different way of approaching making a living as a cartoonist. The common thread was work ethic and hustle.

Santoro half-jokingly described himself as “basically a used book dealer at this point.” Rugg spoke about doing design work and also discussed the Flight School fellowship , a professional development program for Pittsburgh artists he recently participated in.

To see the comics medium getting the attention of an established institution like the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and for it to occur at the Carnegie Museum was inspiring. Here’s hoping for more small events around the country with this level of intimacy and intensity of dialogue.

all in all, you could say…

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Pittsburgh bound, dreaming of Columbus

I’m Pittsburgh bound, but I have pangs to be in Columbus. At the Billy Ireland Library and Museum, more precisely. Man, what a spiritual place…

Julie Sokolow recently produced a short video that explores that Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum at Ohio State University. Watch the Tell Me Something I Don’t Know crew geek out over Nancy panels with librarian, Caitlin Mcgurk.

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Speaking of spiritual places, I’m off to go to Pittsburgh real soon. I have the first edition of my first Dailies collection. I’m damn proud of my babies. I’m looking to give them out to all the good folks that have helped me out  in my cartooning endeavors and then to sell a couple. Hope folks in the ‘burgh like ‘em!
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